In My Day

I’m sure we will revisit these authors in future posts, but for now we offer a sample of the books from her parents’ childhoods – and earlier – that Zelda has begun to love herself.   Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories by Dr. Seuss Learn important life lessons with Yertle, a bird named Gertrude McFuzz, and a rabbit/bear duo that can’t stop arguing. Yertle might be Zelda’s favorite story in this collection – at least for now – in large part because she loves stacking and counting. She doesn’t yet understand the metaphor, but that’s okay. One of the best things about rereading Dr. Seuss books as an adult is finding the larger themes that we absorbed as children without even noticing that we were learning some of life’s greatest lessons. Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak Sendak is by far my favorite author for children, though he didn’t really consider himself as belonging to that category.  This is his most famous book and an excellent introduction into the world of Sendak. Zelda hasn’t seen the movie adaptation yet, but some day we will snuggle on the couch with popcorn and open hearts. Bread and Jam for Frances by Russell Hoban “Too…

Flaps Are Fun

Flaps make our board books interactive. Zelda enters the story and contributes to the plot when she peeks behind flaps to reveal hidden illustrations. We can’t get enough of these flap books, even though we definitely know what’s under all the flaps. Dear Zoo by Rod Campbell This classic by Rod Campbell is a must-have for every child’s library. The narrator asks the zoo for a pet but is not quite satisfied with each animal that is sent. The elephant is too big (of course); the giraffe is too tall (what did they expect?). The illustrations and accompanying flaps give little readers the chance to guess which animal has just arrived. We in the teaching biz call this “making inferences.” Where’s Maisy? by Lucy Cousins Zelda received this book prior to an airplane ride, and we probably read it a dozen times per flight. It’s not a long book, so you can imagine how difficult it was for Zelda’s parents to read it each time with the appropriately surprised-sounding voice inflection when we did, indeed find Maisy once again. (Zelda’s Mommy doesn’t reread suspense novels because the fun is gone when she already knows how it ends, so “looking for Maisy”…